Puppy Socialism

We can do something cool with this neat thing I found, doncha, think?

If you have a heart and maybe a puppy, you know what you must do when the well-intentioned little knot head comes, muddy footed through the doggy door again dragging something dead and nasty. Do you get rid of the dog, call it names, kick it? Well, I said “if you had a heart”, so no. Do you let him keep the smelly dead thing? No, unless you have a thing for stench. In most instances, we just love on the puppy, give it a breath chew and make a bit of fuss, to let them know you are displeased. They now know that all their ideas aren’t great ones. You wonder if the puppy thinks, “Gosh, we should do something with this great thing I found, don’t you think?”

That describes about half the population in America, who think they have an entirely new thought. It just popped right into their head. Maybe it will solve some conundrum that all the experts say can’t be fixed. It usually pops into their head after some character in a movie, or another puppy-minded individual, trying to be the smarter person in the room, mentions it. It’s why the irons in hotel rooms have a tag, “Do not use this device while still wearing the garment.” Oh, and a huge series of internet “fails.”

During the early 19th Century we had this new electricity stuff and we attached it to everything from plants to our fiddle-de-bits expecting it to be a panacea. At least five times in the 20th century alone, it has been tried on a grand scale resulting in a world war, intentional starvation, unintentional starvation, a slaughter of educated people, massive waste of resources and disillusionment of entire nations – and over 100 Million dead. That is the big problem with socialism and social programs, they are reaching for 100% effectiveness and participation of everyone. They are tried on everything too. And, if truth be told, much of what is broken got that way from social programs. America works best like aircraft engines, at ¾ throttle, producing best power at lowest fuel consumption. Not all airplanes fly as high, don’t carry as much and little ones are very nimble but are not as safe as big ones. Individually though, they work best when they operate at less than wide open throttle.

 Every year, those who rediscover socialism in college think, “Gosh, we ought to do something with this thing I found, don’t you think?” Trying socialism again is the rough equivalent of an intense examination of a puppy’s stool, hoping to find a clean end. Maybe use it as a Crayola. All it has ever done is create the same kind of smelly mess – and literally thousands and millions of dead people. One of the greater populist leaders said of socialism, “But the death of one person is a local tragedy, whereas the death of thousands is merely a statistic.”  Now that’s cold. It does not work, and the reasons why are easy to find, and yet they want to try it again.

Why is it then that people do the exact same thing as the puppy and yet we make excuses for them. The dog does not know better, but even a high school educated friend should know not to bring figuratively smelly things around. But they do, and you and I let them get away with it. What we should do is rub their noses in it and swat them with a newspaper.

Spencer A. Allen

Cooties in Congress

Anthropologist Tok Thompson of University of California says Cooties are “profoundly important” if kids choose to participate in the mythology, law and language that surrounds them. Simon Broner of Penn State in Harrisburg says kids represent their own “semiliterate society with their own touchstones” according to an article in Smithsonian magazine by Jane C. Hu. If an adult does stop learning adult critical analysis at adolescence — as I theorize — then it stands to reason some of that mythological reality stays with them in Adult Arrested Adolescence. I introduced you to that concept in my last blog.

Name calling

Look how “adolescent law, myth, language and loyalties become a starting place for adults to become fixed or trapped into a constantly argumentative, self-loathing street fighter for causes.  Politicians with the easy access to the “bully pulpit” of their positions become Tri-As when they use intimidation, threats of suit and other legal action against people who disagree with them.  They are just as apt to become potent salespeople or showmen and could make a real career in either field. Fake news then is nothing new it has just been given permission you might call it when politicians fear to lose the support of voting blocs like BLM or the religious right. So, cooties really play a part in this whole show of Adolescent Impeachment.

They are just techniques used by both the junior high “fem-phenom” who rules an adolescent clique adopted by colorful upwardly mobile politicians on both sides of the aisle of the United States Congress.

The cootie myth

Cootie, is a part of that secret language of children. Their semi-literate societies choose to believe in cooties; they can experience real nauseous if cooties got on them; and there are stories in abundance of children being persecuted for “having cooties.”   Even today, you still see movies that refer to them.  Cooties, boogers and pee-pee are all things that really belong in the pre-adolescent world.   Our parents teach us to keep our fingers out of our noses and kids. quickly figure out that a booger is a ballistic weapon.  We tell our children to wash our hands in the bathroom and watch where we step in public restrooms and some of them figure out boogers, poop and urine can be tools for torment.  This adds a pejorative term or two to the adolescent vocabulary e.g. “Pee-pee head” “You peed in your pants.”  Each becomes terminology in a playground battlefield for position and power.  When an Tri-A finds his place inside some social or political movement, name-calling just becomes another cootie term.  “Figuratively then they decide our side does not have cooties but their side does; I know how to do that!  Those guys are ________!” Look at the kinds of perverse and cruel terms used against President Trump, Obama, Bush all because of political differences rather than real offenses.

 Just fill in the blank with a term like racist, hateful, or anti-anything, and suddenly, they begin to feel at home in a clique, a place that is familiar and cozy. Everyone there understands your language. This kind of public disorder in our legislative branches “trickles down” into the normal citizens activity.

 I have worked as a peach officer called to a disturbance and seen a Tri-A verbalize exactly this sort of thing.  A dog pooped in someone’s yard, they call the police, they call animal control, they go to the city council meetings, and they do crazy things just to promote their own importance and power.  Police see this sort of thing all the time, but it does not affect the entire country when neighbors argue.

An unprecedented black mark on our country

Adult adolescence has greater impact when it occurs in our government and when it becomes rampant in our culture because of our schools.  Tri-As in government are damaging to the entire country.  It creates what we know as a “bunker mentality” that blocks out all rational thought.  It gives a name to a position behind a barrier from which the acolyte figuratively screams: “Don’t argue with me, you have cooties!”

 Without reservation, having understood the FBI from the time that Hoover ran it, working with the FBI people in my areas, I can say they the Mueller, Comey and so-called FBI standoff with congress have none of the adult behavior I saw from earlier FBI agents following Hoover’s creed of conduct.  This is a disgrace to the reputation of the Federal Bureau Reputation and I and sure it will take another Hoover to restore respect.  Seeing them on television, reading the language of their statements and comments, the entire debacle is based on cooties.  Their opposition has cooties and those they support, took money from, peddled influence with, and the way they stacked their investigative staff with true believers is nothing more.  “They got cooties, we don’t.”

The adolescent impeachment and many of those involved on both sides, their staff, their supporters seem more concerned about winning the “gotcha wars” with each other and using the media to keep score.  We have watched mere handful of self-important people play out this farce who are more interested in doing things their way than the original rules under which we were founded.  They are not serving the American people.  What is happening in that regard is a Tri-A process of the junior high clique.  It is sad that the people there do not have greater maturity.

Photo Bruce Anderson, Unsplash

I SEE PIGMENTS TOO

Photo – Tony Ross – Unsplash

“I see pigments of myself from the people I meet.” Kimberly Pauig kimpaulig.wordpress.com

Thank you Kimberly. Today Spence A. Allen, Associate Author of OBSB adds his thoughts to a complex world. WDE

Isn’t this a great way of expressing what we call the “take away” these days when we meet new people or ideas.  Some pigments are great memories that add brilliant hues, or some deep rich meaningful color. I’m a happy guy and the colors decorate my day like flags. Looking up the word pigment, I naturally expected it to mention color. But pigment also means the carbons and metals that occur in nature. Pigments of myself then would then be the very makeup of who you are; that you see in others. That’s rather profound. Certainly, we are all individuals, but we are made up of the same natural elements. That would mean that the only “color” differences we really face are not the things of which we are made, but mythical definitions we have “made up” about the value of other people. We make up the pigments of race like a small child makes up imaginary friends.

We are more alike than we are different. It reminds me of the quotation from Major John Bell Hood – played by Levon Hill in In the Electric Mist: “Venal and evil men are destroying the world you were born in. It’s us against them my good friend. Don’t compromise your principles or abandon your cause.”

 I take that quotation as an upbeat approach to good. We all have the same ability, if we ignore the venal and evil of this world, to achieve great success as a person. Not as a people, but singular as a person — an individual. We can be an island of content and goodness if we recognize the piments. We share them with those who do not compromise their principles or abandon their individual goals. We travel this earth alongside them, recognizing the beauty of our basic sameness, while allowing us both to reach our uniqueness.

Spencer A. Allen

Adolescent Impeachment

It’s a hard read. This show trial business they are calling impeachment makes is hard to watch, understand and hear. But when you look at it from the point of view of the Tri-A or Adult Arrested Adolescent and what we know of the state of American education, it makes sense.

Let’s review. The Tri-A is an adult lifestyle, thinking and behavior model that shares all the characteristics of what we know about adolescence. We know that adolescence is a chaotic period in a teens life, but the Tri-A or Adult Arrested Adolescent is an adult locked in the mindset of a hot blooded, self-absorbed, hormonal teen. That mindset remains into adulthood but gets more complicated when the adult enter the working world, seeking positions where they can “change things” or “make a difference.” That’s when the adolescent tendency to choose almost every hill as the one they are willing to die on gets tedious. Everything they want becomes worthy of the ultimate sacrifice. That is just as long as they can have a Carmel Macchiato afterward and congratulate themselves.

Their side of the impeachment matter thinks they understand those very complex tools that change public opinion – but they are failing in their execution through poor selection of their prepared witnesses (Mini-Manchurian Candidates) who fail to support their hastily drawn and redrawn myth of what constitutes criminal behavior. The adolescent is the first to decide they can redefine things, like my son who decided at age 11 he was a teenager. His logic was that his age now had two numbers, making him a teen. It was just a minor change in interpretation of the rules. “But, but, it looks like a teenager!” (said with angst)

Another stand-out characteristic adolescent trait is the fear of being wrong and inability to accept criticism from those discussing their behavior. Much of what is displayed in the hearings is just that; fear. You see the “prosecution” side trying to find an identity for and a label for what they are doing when the rules do not really apply. There is an ongoing struggle to keep changing labels as the Tri-As seek an identity that works with their peers and supporters. Meanwhile, the adolescent belief that they can baffle us all into believing “their issues” are unique, never before solved and poorly understood by lesser minds. Therefore, actually creating out of thin air those issues has weighed heavily on the main aggressor, Mr. Schiff. Watching the collective minded cohort surrounding him, they become a folie à deux and appear to be apathetic to the madness. As he pounds his gavel in imperious fashion the worn out faux-trial tilts at windmill after windmill in search of a real crime. The Chairman’s chair becomes his own, Rozinante, as he tries to conquer what he sees as simple-minded opposition. It is like early adolescents who still have some idea that somewhere, in some special circumstance, they are special wield almost magical power. “I wear Sargon’s ring, fear me.”
On the other side of the argument there are a few trying to stop what looks like a hissy fit by a clique of Junior High girls who think they “know how.” Those few who do resist seem just as bombastic and oozing of misplaced enthusiasm. They play the role of an older group, somewhat adolescent itself but less collective in their thinking. The two argue over minor issues more because they dislike each other rather than something substantive. The only adults in the room who attempt to bring truth and reason to the situation are ignored. About half of the opposition group exhibit the same fear of criticism and sensitivity as the other. They hesitate to be truly involved for fear their behavior might cost them votes or fewer likes on social media. They certainly don’t want to discolor their self-constructed reality in which they are a sort of white knight, able to understand both sides of the discussion. They sound good, but like most adolescents they make decisions based on feelings and who is praising them. Both sides of the war-of-words, are like teens, tending to underestimate how difficult change and the complexity of things can be. They channel all things through the filter of “what will other people in my clique think?” The actual work they are supposed to be doing has been lost in a dust-devil of tears, hurt feelings and adolescent self-doubt aimed at proving themselves “right.”.

For the most part, the entire episode can be likened to a disagreement over the decoration of the gym for prom by two sides of a simple question that has been answered many times in the past through patience and understanding. This isn’t the first prom; we have fixed problems like this in the past easily and cooperatively. But this time, the aggressor, Mr. Schiff must lose. They act like children, but the adult solution was written long ago specifically to guide us in how to deal with these matters – we have rules. In this case, each side is seeking some Deus ex Machina that provides a third solution without either having to compromise. It’s emblematic of self-destructive Adult Arrested Adolescence. Gone is reason, humanity, kindness and humility.

[1] Folie à deux, shared psychosis, or shared delusional disorder is a psychiatric syndrome in which symptoms of a delusional belief and sometimes hallucinations are transmitted from one individual to another.

[1] :  Deus Ex Machina -A person or thing (as in fiction or drama) that appears or is introduced suddenly and unexpectedly and provides a contrived solution to an apparently insoluble difficulty

Read more at woodyedmiston.blog OBSB Authors

Random Thoughts

Avoid anyone who gives you advice starting with “All you have to do is . . because these people will cause you pain.

Occam’s Razor does not apply to conspiracy theories.

Love is what make’s two people think they are pretty even when no one else does.

Any person, having taken delivery of a dump truck load of 9 yards of earth — and being equipped with only a shovel and a wheelbarrow will have no problem with the suggestion aliens built the pyramids.

A Beginning

A couple of years ago, Looking Backward, Forward was published. I wrote the book and placed it on Amazon to copyright so to speak a concept.  It wasn’t ready. At the time, having a Website and Blog had not entered my radar; I had no idea what it could be.  This is the first in a blog series that is what that book should have been in the first place.

Looking Backward, Forward – the Blog

Some 40 percent of our culture contains adults who are locked into thinking characteristically like an adolescent child, a term coined as Adult Arrested Adolescent or Tri-A.  It is derived from my reading of Eric Hoffer’s book, The True Believer, thoughts on the nature of mass movements, (1951.) Hoffer was the first to give us definitions and an understanding of how mass movements work. Central to his concepts is the idea of the true believer. True believers see themselves as damaged. They instinctively look for a way to fix themselves by becoming part of something bigger and not always better. Being famous for crazy stuff is good enough. Ideas like Progressivism, Socialism, Catholicism, Christianity as a religion, Protestantism, and Islam also contain a large number of fanatics. Social Reformers like Barack Obama seek out these who mistakenly or foolishly see themselves as nonredeemable. They offer them glory by “hitching themselves” to their movements. To accomplish that ruse, Obama bastardized an idea of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s whose suggestion was for the individual to personally set high goals, “hitched to stars” rather than subsume themselves to lower expectations. To be fair, warrior chiefs, generals, and all other forms of totalitarians seeking cannon fodder have used the same spiel throughout history. From those ideas I began to look at them as seeds of a latter-day behavioral disorder I previously called Tri-A or Adult Arrested Adolescence.  Hoffer didn’t say a word about the Tri-A himself, my research following his line of thinking lead me to the Adult Arrested Adolescent.  

Utopian schemers have created the Tri-A to be the ideal follower to their causes.

Then as now, Hoffer showed us that Utopians are constantly trying to make their fiddling a needed control mechanism of mainstream American culture. If then the Tri-A concept takes that one step further, and they do line up very well, I contend it was not an accident. By manipulating the American school systems quietly and promoting politically correctness culturally Utopian schemers have created the Tri-A to be the ideal follower to their causes. On this topic I will be discussing the entire issue as if preparing a probable cause statement by an investigator. Developing the idea of cause is part of my background and training. Perhaps one day a psychological tool can be created to determine by a set of established standards if the Tri-A as a legitimate addition for the Desk Reference to Diagnostic Criteria. It may become a diagnosis like Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or Depression.

After WWII and the revelations of what fanaticism had done to millions in the world, Hoffer could study the direct cause and effect of manipulative governments and populist leaders.  Hoffer watched these activities as they occurred during the 1930’s through the 1950’s.  He then compared them in The True Believer to ideas that are more ancient and the words of commentators who spoke on similar eternal truths of those periods.  What he taught us has passed the test of time.  Hoffer understood mass movements because he immersed himself in the topic. Since 2006 I have spent hundreds of hours studying the Tri-A.   For the last three decades since first reading his book, I have applied his ideas to what has happened in America.  Since the lure of Utopian ideas and political movements are highly attractive to the person who feels he is damaged and incomplete they are interested in changing things.  Change — without any further definition has become a war cry for Progressive partisans trying to recruit those who seek to reinvent themselves. The same partisan evangelists promise that change will make the damaged person whole but offer only fairness, equality, and promises of creating new legislation.  Each evangelist hopes that their one great effort will guarantee equality and fairness.  They tell every listener the solution is to promote the concept of centralization of all matters to the highest authority.  The first problem with all their solutions is that fairness and equality are concepts that work between individuals.  A third party, unless it is a judge deciding a fact of law, is a poor choice to determine fairness for others. So is a judge, but that’s how we set it up in the legal system. Fair solutions cannot be enforced by a top-down structure that comes from an overeager government.  As far as centralization and dictation from government on the outcome of things is concerned – why do we think people in government know better?  The kids of my heyday would have said, “Who died and made you king?”  Secondly, teaching that there is an ultimate authority to which all disputes can be referred does not teach self-reliance and the ability to negotiate with your friends and neighbors.  In early civilizations, the elders of more organized societies met at the city gate to act as judges in disputes.  It is an ancient method.  But involving the police or courts in your affairs speaks of weakness of character and that you cannot reach a constructive agreement.  At that point, the only thing left is to recover damages from whatever the elements of the dispute show are called for. Letting others decide how to live your life is like shooting nuclear warheads.   A real rocket scientist who worked in the intercontinental missile program told me, “No matter what happens, if we use these things; we lose.”  To teach children that they cannot get through life without handouts or help from the “boss” is to teach them to be peasants.  We lose. Have you not asked yourself if there is something more serious going on when grown people have no understanding of things taught in high school.  They cannot understand or construct simple sentences or grasp more complex issues like cause and effect?   Were you slightly amused at the number of people who went to psychiatrists because their candidate lost the election in 2016?  Do the people who serve you, work for you, sit next to you at a ball game sometimes amaze you with their childish view of things?  Do you wonder how they arrive at concepts like, “Drug free zones” or “Safe Spaces” since those are hopelessly childish views of how social control works?  That is the point.  They are not just acting like kids; they really are still adolescents behaviorally. They let others tell them how to live and so nor understand why it does not always work out in their favor, interpreting fair and equal as “The way I want it to be.”  

In later posts I will continue to layer evidence that will point to the validity of the Tri-A or Adult Arrested Adolescent. Follow us and leave your email so we may keep you updated. WDE

Mistakes

Today’s blog is by Spencer A. Allen

So much of life is about mistakes. It was once a problem of enormous importance to never make a mistake, thereby never revealing the depth of my ignorance. I took to heart Lincoln’s warning: “Remain silent and be thought a fool or speak out and remove all doubt.”  In my mind, the the likelihood that revelation was more likely than not.

But the only way we learn is to make mistakes and repair them. Even when we receive training on some discipline, then actually doing them poorly is first required before we become accomplished.  School kids, like I was, often get the idea it is not safe to make mistakes.  I tell those I teach the reason they are in school is because it is a safe space to make mistakes and try not to react badly when they do.  Many instructors fail to support the idea of a safe mistake place by overreacting to minor spills, slow trips to the restroom, or failing to recharge computers.

We send our athletes to specialized training camps our dancers and cheerleaders to places where they can accel, but that is all about excellence.  How about the rest of us who need to learn from our mistakes to become competent – especially those whose parents can’t afford dance or training camp. 

Kids are loud. Adults sometimes find that annoying, kids get into scuffles, adults get very emotional about potential injury. But locking down the education process to the point of regimented 50-minute classes where students complete 10 or 20 multiple choice questions by reading several pages in a book.  They don’t get to stretch their imaginations or time to complete more complex or in-depth study.

Maybe high school should adopt the college model. Two-hour classes and one and a half hour classes on alternating days.  Let them find something that brings them joy – not be crammed full of facts in preparation for a test. That will keep statisticians busy appeasing state legislators with tests results that tell us nothing about learning.

Thanks for reading, Spence Allen (SAllen@woodyedmiston.blog)